• Swirl Logo tan

    Virginia Chang, Ph.D.
    Certified End -of -Life Doula

    How do you want to live until the very last moment?

  • Swirl Logo tan

    Virginia Chang, Ph.D.
    Certified End -of -Life Doula

    How do you want to live until the very last moment?

Till The Last End -Of -Life Doula Services

Till The Last provides end-of-life doula services for those thinking about or approaching death. We will support you and your family and loved ones with professional and individualized emotional, spiritual, and physical care. This means engaging you and your loved ones before, during, and after death. We will be an advocate for your wishes and needs in the end-of-life process and offer you guidance, information, and resources, as needed.

We recognize that it is important to observe the plan of care and will communicate with your established professional healthcare team. At Till The Last, we commit to providing you with the highest quality of care possible.

 

List of Services Includes:

  • companion to the dying person and their loved ones

  • facilitator for unresolved issues or family dynamics

  • advice and assistance on Advance Care Directives

  • life review/finding meaning

  • legacy work

  • meditation and breath awareness

  • rituals and ceremonies

  • respite support

  • end of life planning: wake, funeral, memorial, burial, cremation, eco-friendly alternatives

  • vigil planning and support

  • eulogy and obituary writing

  • post-death grief processing

  • resource referral for other care services, such as acupuncture, music thanatology, reiki, massage

 

Since the health and personal circumstances of each person vary, the cost for end-of-life doula services varies.
The initial consultation will be at no cost.  Based upon your individual needs and timeframe, a package price will be determined,
and a Service Agreement will be completed before our work begins.

 

All personal and medical information will be held strictly confidential.

No person who wants support or presence at end-of-life should go without. Please contact me to discuss further.

Read About Virginia in the April 2019 issue of The Bronx Voice

Visiting Volunteers Bring Comfort—and a Dog named Chicken
bronxvoice.com
By Chandra Wilson

HEALTH- April is National Volunteer Month, a time to recognize the more than 60 million Americans who volunteer their time year-round, including hospice volunteers who play an important role in end-of-life care for many individuals and families in New York communities.  In fact, volunteers are such a vital part of hospice care, their presence is mandated by law and in keeping with the broader social mission to build a community of care at end of life.

. . . . .

Volunteers can also choose to be part of bedside vigils, an especially important and intense endeavor that requires additional training on the physical, psychosocial and spiritual aspects of a person actively dying, including what happens to the body as it shuts down. “It is a profound and intimate experience,” says Alison Reynoso, who coordinates the vigil volunteers at Visiting Nurse Service of New York Hospice and Palliative Care. “It’s an honor to be in a person’s presence as they take their last breath.”

Before she knew anything about hospice, Virginia Chang had experienced the deaths of three people very close to her in the short space of seven months, she was bereft and overwhelmed and searching for answers as she worked personally to process her grief. The more she learned about end-of-life care and the “positive death movement,” the more she began to see that the deep sense of powerlessness and hopelessness she’d felt in her own situation was not the only option.

When she signed up for the hospice volunteer training program at the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, she knew she was stepping into a new and transformative chapter in her life. She realized that she could put what she was learning to good use and help someone who might have been in a similar situation to the overwhelming shock and sadness that she herself had felt.

“If I could turn around and help someone else through what had been so difficult for me,”  Virginia says, “it would all have been worthwhile.”

Now that she’s completed hospice volunteer training, Virginia visits patients and their families one-on-one in their own homes every week, usually for about an hour or so. She also makes volunteer visits to VNSNY’s Goodman Brown Residence to patients who are not able to spend their last days at home. But she considers sitting vigil with someone who lives alone while they are actively dying to be one of the most profound and rewarding experiences she has had as a volunteer.

“It’s incredible, it’s an amazing time to be with someone,” Virginia says. “One of the things I’ve learned and one of the things that will continue to call me to this work is that when you are with people at this point in their lives, they are so authentic—you’re meeting the real person. This is the essence of who they are; they don’t have a façade up, they’re not playing games with you, there’s such a quality to the interaction. It has changed me a lot, in ways I couldn’t have expected.”

Read About Virginia in the April 2019 issue of the Bronx Voice

Visiting Volunteers Bring Comfort—and a Dog named Chicken
bronxvoice.com
By Chandra Wilson

HEALTH- April is National Volunteer Month, a time to recognize the more than 60 million Americans who volunteer their time year-round, including hospice volunteers who play an important role in end-of-life care for many individuals and families in New York communities. In fact, volunteers are such a vital part of hospice care, their presence is mandated by law and in keeping with the broader social mission to build a community of care at end of life.

. . . . .

Before she knew anything about hospice, Virginia Chang had experienced the deaths of three people very close to her in the short space of seven months, she was bereft and overwhelmed and searching for answers as she worked personally to process her grief. The more she learned about end-of-life care and the “positive death movement,” the more she began to see that the deep sense of powerlessness and hopelessness she’d felt in her own situation was not the only option.

When she signed up for the hospice volunteer training program at the Visiting Nurse Service of New York, she knew she was stepping into a new and transformative chapter in her life. She realized that she could put what she was learning to good use and help someone who might have been in a similar situation to the overwhelming shock and sadness that she herself had felt.

“If I could turn around and help someone else through what had been so difficult for me,” Virginia says, “it would all have been worthwhile.”

Now that she’s completed hospice volunteer training, Virginia visits patients and their families one-on-one in their own homes every week, usually for about an hour or so. She also makes volunteer visits to VNSNY’s Goodman Brown Residence to patients who are not able to spend their last days at home. But she considers sitting vigil with someone who lives alone while they are actively dying to be one of the most profound and rewarding experiences she has had as a volunteer.

“It’s incredible, it’s an amazing time to be with someone,” Virginia says. “One of the things I’ve learned and one of the things that will continue to call me to this work is that when you are with people at this point in their lives, they are so authentic—you’re meeting the real person. This is the essence of who they are; they don’t have a façade up, they’re not playing games with you, there’s such a quality to the interaction. It has changed me a lot, in ways I couldn’t have expected.”